Adventurous Annapurna Circuit Trek for women travellers

This tour allows you to explore ancient temples and religious shrines of the three medieval kingdoms, known as Kathmandu, Bhaktapur and Patan. While touring you will find yourself that unknowingly you have been flown back into an ancient time. In Kathmandu, the capital city of Nepal, your first visit will be to the holiest of Hindu shrine “Pashupatinath”. Pashupatinath temple is dedicated to Lord Shiva, one of the trinity and the guardian (patron) deity of the Hindus. Around this temple, you will witness Hindu’s ritual of cremating a corpse. Next attraction will be proceeding towards Buddhist stupa at Boudhanath . This trip also includes visit to the major cultural heritages and temples in Bhaktapur and Patan.

After the sight seeing tour we proceed to Annapurna region for our adventurous Annapurna Circuit Trek. This circuit of Annapurna - rightly known as Nepal's classic trek - offers more variety than any other walks of equivalent length, and takes you through virtually every type of scenery that Nepal has to offer. There are superb views of Annapurna and Dhaulagiri, and the constant variety of landscapes ranges from sub-tropical through alpine to an arid semi-desert akin to Tibet; at the climax of the trek there's a formidable 5416m pass, the Thorong La, to cross.

Trip Facts:
  • Trip Length: 21 nights 22 days
  • Activity : Cultural sight seeing tour & Tea House Trekking into Annapurna region
  • Starts in : Kathmandu
  • Ends in : Kathmandu
Day to day itinerary:

Day 01: Arrival at Kathmandu International Airport and transfer to hotel. Stay overnight at hotel in Kathmandu.

Day 02: Sightseeing tour of Pashupatinath, Boudhanath and Swayambhunath. Stay overnight at hotel in Kathmandu.

Pashupatinath Temple

Situated 5 kilometers east of Kathmandu City, Pashupatinath temple is one of the holiest temples dedicated to Lord Shiva. Situated amidst a lush green natural setting on the bank of the sacred Bagmati river, the temple built in pagoda style has jilted roof and richly carved silver doors. Visitors will be permitted to view the temple from the east bank of Bagmati River, entrance in the temple being strictly forbidden to all non Hindus. Pashupatinath is the centre of annual pilgrimage on the day of shivaratri which falls in the month of February/March. Behind the temple are the cremation grounds.

Boudhanath Stupa

This Stupa, 8 kilometers east of Kathmandu City, is one of the biggest in the world of its kind. It stands with four pairs of eyes in the four cardinal direction keeping watch for righteous behaviour and human prosperity. This Buddhis Stupa was built by King Man Deva at the advice of the Goddess Mani Jogini. It is built on an octagonal base inset with prayer wheels. The shrine is ringed by houses of Lamas or Buddhist priest.

Swayambhunath Stupa

Swayambhunath is located approximately 4 kilometers and this Buddhist Stupa is said to be 2000 years old. The Stupa which forms the main structure is composed of a solid hemisphere of brick and earth supporting a lofty conical spire capped by a pinnacle of copper gilt. Painted on the four sided base of the spire are the all seeing eyes of Lord Buddha. This hill is a mosaic of small Chaityas and Pagoda temples.

Day 03: Sightseeing tour of Patan and Bhaktapur and drive back to Kathmandu. Stay overnight at hotel in Kathmandu.

Patan Durbar Square

Patan Durbar Square, like its counterpart in Kathmandu, is an enchanting mélange of palace buildings, artistic courtyards and graceful pagoda temples. Listed as a World Heritage Site, the former royal palace complex is the center of Patan’s religious and social life, and houses a museum containing an array of bronze statues and religious objects. One remarkable monument here is a 17th-century temple dedicated to the Hindu god Krishna, built entirely of stone

The main attractions in Patan

Beside above mentioned places to visit there are other significant sites to be visited:

  1. Golden Temple
  2. Kumbheshwar
  3. Krishna Mandir
  4. Jagat Narayan
  5. Mahaboudha
  6. Ashokan Stupa
  7. Machchhendranath Temple
  8. The Tibetan Camp

Bhaktapur (1,401m) covers an area of four square miles. Bhaktapur or the city of devotees still retains a medieval charm and visitors to this ancient town are treated to myriad wonders of cultural and artistic achievements. The past glory of the Malla rules continues to be reflected at the Darbar Square. Pottery and waving are its traditional industries. Bhaktapur is famous for woodcarving and the traditional topi or cap. The city lies about 14 km east of Kathmandu. The places of interest include Bhaktapur Darbar Square, the National Art Gallery, Nyatapola Temple, Bhairavnath Temple, Dattatreya Temple and Dattatreya Square.


Bhaktapur Durbar Square The main square of the city contains innumerable temples and other architectural showpieces such as lion gate, the golden gate, the statue of King Bhupatindra Malla, Dattatraya Temple etc.


A magnificent statue of King Bhupatindra Malla in the act of worship is placed on a column facing the palace. It was listed in the UNESCO world Heritage Monument List in 1979.

Palace of 55 Windows Being built by King Yaksha Mall in 1427 A.D. and remodeled by King Bhupatindra Malla in 17th Century, the balcony and the windows are intricately carved is a masterpiece of wood carving.


Nyatapola Temple This five storied Pagoda Style temple was built by King Bhupatindra Malla in 1708 A.D. well known for its massive structure and subtle workmanship. It is the tallest pagoda structure in the Kathmandu valley.

Day 04: Drive from Kathmandu to Beshishahar (760m.) and it takes about seven hours. You drive along the Kathmandu-Pokhara Highway to Dumre and then follow the narrow and paved road by the Marsyangdi River to Besi Sahar (823m.). It takes almost seven hours. Beshishahar is the district headquarters of Lamjung district. All the local government offices are situated here. From here, you can see some of mountain peak, natural sceneries surrounding the valley and the daily activities of local people. This headquarter is the centre from where the daily usable commodities are supplied to the different villages and numerous towns.

Day 05: Trek from Beshishahar to Nagdi (930m.) which takes about six hours. The first part of the trail passes thorough flat level along the bank of the Marshyangdi River. You can enjoy the sceneries and the local culture of Gurung community. Here you walk through the rice terrace fields with good views of various mountains.

Day 06: Trek from Nagdi to Jagat (1300m.) and it takes about six hours. A steep trail ascends from Nagdi, through rice terraces, before crossing a stream at the bottom of a small waterfall. It then climbs again and traverses the hillside high above the river before reaching the village of Lili Gaon. Ahead, the Marsyangdi valley forms a steep V-shape, and you follow the winding mountain path down through Syange and along the river for some distance. The trail then climbs steeply and the path is cut into the sheer cliff-face some 200-300m above the riverbed. Eventually you descend to the stone village of Jagat, situated on a shelf, which juts into the precipitous Marsyangdi valley. You stay overnight at tea house (lodge).

Day 07: Trek from Jagat to Dharapani (1860m.) which takes about six and half hours. The trail from Jagat descends until it almost reaches the river and then begins to climb again through a forest. The sheer cliff on the opposite bank plunges downward but this side is also steep. When the climb ends, you follow a level track to Chyamje, which is marked by a magnificent waterfall on the opposite bank. After descending to the river and crossing a suspension bridge, you begin a climb to Sattale on a path so steep that it seems one slip would send you hurtling down into the valley. You continue on an undulating path above the river, and at one point, where a tributary flows in from the opposite bank, the main river becomes covered with huge boulders that hide the water. Climbing the zigzag path to the top of the hill, you see the level, plain of Tal before you. Though it is enclosed by cliffs, the level area looks reassuring after the harrowing mountain paths just traveled on. You descend to a grassy riverbank that leads to Tal with its hotels and teahouses. Beyond Tal, the valley narrows and the path becomes high and winding, and in several areas hewn from the rock itself. Beyond the small village of Karte, there is a bit more cliff-walking before the path drops again to the river. You cross a suspension bridge, and climb the short distance to the stone kani marking the entrance to Dharapani, and you stay for the night.

Day 08: Trek from Dharapani to Chame (2670m.) which takes about five hours. As you cut through a narrow field from the village, the Dudh Khola, which originates from the south face of Manaslu, enters on the opposite bank. The Marsyangdi then veers to the left, and as Annapurna II becomes visible ahead, you arrive at Bagarchhap, a Bhote village with prayer flags fluttering in the breeze. Continuing to climb through forests of pine and oak, you pass through Dhanakyu before coming to a thundering waterfall. Further, the Marsyangdi Khola enters a gorge and the path consists of steep stone steps. Pausing for breath, you can look back for views of Manaslu. When the steep incline ends, you follow a path amid magnificent rhododendrons to Ratamron and then continue on a gently rising path, crossing a stream before entering a pine forest. You then cut across a loose hillside to the hamlet of Kotho from where you can look straight up at nearby Annapurna II - a sight convincing you that you are deep in the Himalayan mountains! From here the trail climbs through a fir and pine forest to Chame where there are government offices, shops, and hotels. Chame is the administrative headquarters for the Manang district.

Day 09: Trek from Chame to Pisang (3155m.) and it takes about five hours.With Lamjung Himal [6893m] sparkling in the morning sun, you set off for Pisang. The mountain disappears as you climb the path up the valley, passing a huge apple orchard. You continue through a fir and pine forest, climbing to a high, rocky area as the opposite bank becomes an impassable cliff. From this point, the valley becomes extremely steep-sided as you follow the path to Bratang. In the past this was the military station for troops who fought against the Khampa tribal revolution, but the dilapidated buildings are all that remained of that era. A short climb from the village brings you to a rock-strewn area where you cross a wooden bridge and follow a high, winding path, before crossing back to the right bank again. You now walk through a pine forest and as the forest ends, the valley changes from a V-shape to a gentle U-shape, opening up a wonderful vista before you. You can see the east peak of Annapurna II as well as Pisang Peak to the north-east. Continuing on, you come to a long Mani wall by a bridge and the lower village of Pisang.

Day 10: Trek from Pisang to Manang (3540m.) which takes about five hours. Beyond Pisang, the trail climbs a steep ridge, which affords good views of the Manang valley and Tilicho peak. Descending past Manang's airstrip at Hongde, you come to a level area from where the northeast face of Annapurna III rises majestically above you. From the wide plains of the Sabje Khola Valley, Annapurna IV [7525m] also becomes visible. Just beyond this point you cross the considerably reduced flow of the Marsyangdi Khola via a wooden bridge to the tiny village of Mungji. Cultivated fields appear on both sides of the path and off to the right, below a craggy mountain, you can see the village of Bryaga with its splendid monastery. Large chorten and mani walls abound and the tall peaks of the Himalaya spread out before you - Annapurna II, Annapurna III, Annapurna IV, Gangapurna [7455m] and, to the rear, Tilicho Peak [7134m]. After a short steep climb you reach Manang which is a surprisingly large village for this remote mountain region. You stay here for the night, amidst the fluttering prayer flags that adorn the houses.

Day 11: Rest day at Manang for acclimatization. It demands an important rest and acclimatization day before crossing the Thorung La. There are optional day walks such as crossing the river to see the tremendous icefall coming down from the Annapurnas, or climbing high above the village for a full panorama of the Annapurna range and the Manang Valley. There is also a Himalayan Rescue Association [HRA] aid post in the village which makes an interesting and educational visit.

Day 12: Trek from Manang to Yak Kharka (4018m.) which takes about three and half hours. Now the trail ascends gently all the way to Yak Kharka passing through the Gunsang (3960m.)village. En route, you can see panoramic views all the day.

Day 13: Trek from Yak Kharka to Thorong Phedi (4450m.) which takes about three and half hours. Leaving Yak Kharka, you climb gradually to a ridge before descending to the headwaters of the Marsyangdi and crossing via a covered wooden bridge. After a short ascent up the mountain path on the right bank, you follow a narrow trail across an unstable screed slope and then descend to Thorong Phedi.

Day 14: Trek from Thorong Phedi to Thorong La (5416m.) to Muktinath (3800m.) which takes about seven hours. It demands an early start today for your crossing of Thorong La [5416m]. The trail becomes steep immediately on leaving camp but as local people have used this trail for hundreds of years, the path is well defined. The gradient then eases and after around 4 hours of steady climbing, you reach the chorten and prayer flags of the pass. The views are dramatic to say the least, from the snow-covered mountains above, to the head of the Kali Gandaki valley below and the brown and purple hills of Mustang which are spread out before us. The descent to Muktinath is a knee pounding 1600m but it is compensated for with excellent views of Dhaulagiri. Eventually the moraines give way to grassy slopes before a pleasant walk along the Jhong Khola Valley to Muktinath and its shrines and temple.

Day 15: Trek from Muktinath to Jomsom (2710m.) and it takes about approximately five hours. You now begin the descent path down the dramatic Kali Gandaki Gorge, initially through arid country in the same geographical and climatic zone as Tibet. After passing through Jharkot and Khingar, villages with typical Tibetan architecture, you follow the valley floor most of the way to Jomsom. Jomsom is sprawled along both banks of the Kali Gandaki and from here there are fine views of the Nilgiri peaks. You continue down to Marpha, a delightful Thakali village, complete with a drainage system beneath the flagstone streets. Its narrow alleys and passageways provide welcome shelter from the strong winds of the Kali Gandaki Gorge and Marpha is particularly well known for its apples, apple cider and apple juice, apricot and peach brandy.

Day 16: Trek from Jomsom to Kalopani (2530m.) which takes about six hours. Your trail follows flat level along the bank of Kali Gandaki river until you reach Kalopani, a Thakali village and the southern-most limit of Tibetan Buddhism . En route, you find Larjung which is situated near Dhaulagiri Glacier. The first part of the trek passes through the windy area covered with pine forests, rhododendron forests and birches are seen. At Kalopani, you are quite amazed at the panoramic view of Annapurna I (8091m.), Dhaulagiri I (8167m.) and Tukuche peak (6920m.).

Day 17: Trek from Kalopani to Tatopani (1190 m.) which takes about six and half hours. While crossing steeply descent path through forests you reach Ghasa (2010m.), a Thakali village. The surrounding area of Ghasa is famous destination for bird watching and wild Marijuana. Here you are quite amazed at the panoramic view of Mount Nilgiri North (7061m.), Nilgiri Central (6940m.), and Nilgiri South (6839m.) and others. From here, the trail descends steeply upto Rukse Chhahara (Rukse Waterfall) which is amazing to look at as it is the highest waterfall. There is situated the deepest gorge of the world between two mountains Annapurna I (8091m.) and Dhaulagiri I (8167m.) facing each other near Rukse Waterfall. The trail again descends slightly to Tatopani through different human settlements. You can enjoy the hot spring at Tatopani as the word Tatopani is termed after the natural hot spring situated at the bank of the Kali Gandaki River. It is popularly believed that taking bath in Hot Spring helps you to get rid of skin diseases. Along this, it gives you physical and mental refreshment as well.

Day 18: A rest day at Tatopani to enjoy the natural hot spring bath. It is believed that one who takes bath get rids of skin diseases. After several days trekking, it is a great idea to take bath at hot spring and relax.

Day 19: Trek from Tatopani to Ghorepani (2750m.) and it takes about six and half hours. Your trail passes through flat level of the land at some distance. Then the trail begins ascending steeply for at least one hour. Now path goes up through different villages inhabited by the people of different caste and agricultural land. The majority of the people here serve Gorkha Regiment and Indian Regiment as well. While trekking you cross through the Kali Gandaki river with panoramic view of Dhaulagiri and Annapurna ranges. Now the trail ascends gently all the way to Ghorepani passing through small villages like Phalate, Chitre and so on. While trekking you pass through rhododendron forests and come across the wild life such as monkeys and birds of various species. You are accompanied by more panoramic views of different mountains. Ghorepani (Watering to Horse) is a small pass and the village of Deurali. Although there is time enough to continue, it is better to stay here overnight so that you can make the morning trip to Poon Hill (3180m.) for an outstanding panorama of Dhaulagiri I, II, III, IV, Tukuche peak, Dhampus peak, Nilgiri ranges, Annapurna I, Baraha Sikhar (Twelve peaks or renowned as French Fang),Annapurna South, Himchuli, Fishtail and Mardi Himal. The view you can see from here is probably the best view in the world. Not only this, Poon Hill is crowded by different visitors to enjoy the sunrise and sunset over the snow-capped mountains.

Day 20: Trek from Ghorepani to Poon Hill and trek to Nayapul (1050m.) which takes about 7 hours. Drive from Nayapul to Pokhara and it takes about one and half hours. Early morning trip to Poon Hill (3232m.) to enjoy the sunrise view over Mt. Dhaulagiri (8167m.), Tukuche Peak (6920m.), Nilgiri (6940m.), Varaha Shikhar (7847m.), Mt. Annapurna I (8091m.), Annapurna South (7219m.), Annapurna III (7855m.), Machhapuchhre (6993m.), Annapurna IV (7525m.), Annapurna II (7937m.), Lamjung Himal (6931m.) and other numerous snowcapped mountain peaks. After breakfast trek Ghorepani to Pokhara via Tirkhedhunga and trail is gradual descent through rhododendron and Oak forest up to Banthati. While trek from Banthati to Ulleri, the trail descends gently and Ulleri is a beautiful Magar village and it is steep descent until you reach Tirkhedhunga. Now you trek along gradual descent path up somewhere and leveler path for couple of hours to reach Nayapul.

Day 21: Drive from Pokhara to Kathmandu by tourist mini bus that takes about seven hours. While driving from Pokhara to Kathmandu, you head up to Damauli,, Dumre, Muglin and Kurintar where the Nepal's first Cable car is operated to reach to Manakamana Temple. En route, you could enjoy the mountain views, green sceneries, rice terrace fields, vegetable fields and people being engaged in their daily life activities. From Naubishe you climb up to Thankot, the gateway to capital city.

Email us for more details, up to date pricing and the information about our group departures.